March 17, 2013

Global Studies Gelbard Lecture “Egypt’s Pivotal Moment”

Posted in Uncategorized tagged , , , at 10:05 pm by Benedicte Mauguiere

. Michele Dunne, director of the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hairi Center for the Middle East

Dr. Dunne has served in the White House on the National Security Council staff, on the State Department’s Policy Planning Staff and in its Bureau of Intelligence and Research, and as a diplomat in Cairo and Jerusalem. Prior to joining the Atlantic Council, she was a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, where she edited the Arab Reform Bulletin and carried out research on Arab politics and US policies. She holds a doctorate in Arabic language and linguistics from Georgetown University, where she has served as a visiting professor of Arabic and Arab studies. Her research interests include Arab politics, political transitions, economic reform, Egypt, Israeli-Palestinian issues, and US and European policies in the Middle East. She co-chairs the Working Group on Egypt, a bipartisan group of experts established in February 2010 to mobilize US government attention to the forces of change in that country.

 Date: Monday March 18, 2013
 Time: 7:00 p.m Location: SSWAC / 104 ParkerReed Room

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“Slippery Jingles and Other Political Satire in China Today”

Posted in Uncategorized tagged , , at 10:02 pm by Benedicte Mauguiere

 “Slippery Jingles and Other Political Satire in China Today”
In any society, jokes can be useful in expressing complaints about public affairs and in releasing people’s pent-up tensions.  In authoritarian societies, such uses of jokes can be especially important.  This lecture will look at some of the popular media for political satire in compemporary China, and will look at what some of the social, psychological, and political effects seem to be.

March 18, 4:00 pm. Lovejoy 215. Colby College

Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood for Love

Posted in Bénédicte Mauguière tagged , at 10:00 pm by Benedicte Mauguiere

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Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood for Love

Maine Film Center, with support from Colby College Cinema Studies, presents  Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood for Love (2000)

Monday, March 18
7:00 p.m.
Waterville Opera House

The third of four films in the series Monday Night Movies.

Tickets $9 ($5 for students)

A visually beautiful film that can only be experienced fully when projected on a large screen.

January 18, 2013

Literary Spotlight: Anne Hébert

Posted in Bénédicte Mauguière tagged , , , , , , at 8:42 pm by Benedicte Mauguiere

By Dr. Bénédicte Mauguière

A poet, playwright, and novelist, Anne Hébert grew up in Quebec. The daughter of a poet and literary critic, she started writing at an early age and soon began submitting her poems for publication. Early in her career, Hébert spent time writing for radio, television, and theater as she developed her literary character and skill. After publishing her first collection of poetry, Les Songes en équilibre (Dreams in Equilibrium), in 1942, she starting writing prose, composing a collection of tales called Le Torrent (The Torrent) in 1950.

After writing another anguishing collection of poetry, several Quebec publishers questioned whether they should continue to publish Hébert’s work. Anne Hébert soon decided to move to Paris where her work would be more welcomed and proceeded to publish eight novels. Embracing such themes as personal freedom, rebellion, and violence, she examined the human psyche in such books as Kamouraska, Les Enfant du sabbat (Children of the Black Sabbath), and Les Fous de Bassan (In the Shadow of the Wind). In 1999, Anne Hébert published her final novel, Un Habit de lumière (A Suit of Light), just one year before her death.

About the author: A scholar of Anne Hébert’s work, Dr. Bénédicte Mauguière currently teaches and researches at Colby College in Maine. Dr. Bénédicte Mauguière has published several papers on Hébert’s role in “la littérature québécoise.”

December 20, 2012

An Overview of Francophone Studies, by Bénédicte Mauguière

Posted in Uncategorized tagged , at 7:10 am by Benedicte Mauguiere

Many universities offer students the option of majoring in French and Francophone Studies. This course of study focuses on the French language as well as French-speaking cultures from all over the world. Students thoroughly learn all the nuances of the language, including various dialects, grammar, pronunciation, syntax, and punctuation. They also learn an appreciation for and understanding of diverse cultures.

Those interested in majoring in French and Francophone Studies should possess a desire to learn about another language and culture, an ear for patterns in language and communication, and an eagerness to communicate, both oral and written. It is also recommended that students travel and study in France or in a francophone country at some point during their studies. There are many jobs open to students, including French teacher, foreign service officer, translator, travel guide, speech pathologist, interpreter, foreign social worker, as well as many opportunities in NGOs.

About Bénédicte Mauguière:

Prof. Mauguière possesses a Ph.D. in Francophone Cultures and Literatures and she has authored numerous publications in the field. She currently teaches Francophone Studies at Colby College in Maine.

December 3, 2012

An Overview of the American Comparative Literature Association by Bénédicte Mauguière

Posted in Uncategorized tagged , at 9:46 pm by Benedicte Mauguiere

Founded in 1960, the American Comparative Literature Association is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting the work and efforts of scholars involved in multiple literatures and cultures, as well as those interested in cross-cultural literary study. Members share a common interest in studying and teaching comparisons between nations, languages, and cultures across the world. Serving a rather small demographic, the Association currently comprises 2,000 members. The organization is also affiliated with other societies, including the American Council of Learned Societies and the International Comparative Literature Association.

The American Comparative Literature Association holds an annual meeting where members can convene and share and critique each other’s papers and research. The conference features small-group meetings where members discuss these papers. It also features workshops, roundtable discussions, and sessions about relevant topics as well as a celebratory banquet. The Association also facilitates networking between scholars and offers travel grants and other resources to help members with their studies.

About the author: Bénédicte Mauguière is currently a Professor of French and Francophone Studies at Colby College. She has been involved in academia for many years and is a member of the American Comparative Literature Association.

November 6, 2012

An Overview of Paris Sorbonne University (Paris IV)

Posted in Uncategorized tagged , , at 8:13 pm by Benedicte Mauguiere

The Sorbonne is recognized as one of the oldest universities in the world. With origins as far back as the 13th century, the heart of this school remains anchored in its original medieval structure. Over the years, it has expanded into the Latin Quarter and other regions throughout the city, and today, it ranks among France’s largest structures. Featuring courses in languages, letters, human sciences, the arts, and other fields, the school is renowned for its strong culture and premier faculty. The Sorbonne promotes independent thinking among its more than 23,000 students, and it values adopting new technologies.

The school possesses a heavy cultural bent, producing more than 100 artistic events every year. The public can attend these concerts, recitals, debates, and exhibitions, which receive sponsors from the Maison des Ecrivains et de la Littérature and the Opéra National de Paris.

About the Author: Scholar Bénédicte Mauguière has taught Francophone Studies at Colby College, appeared on panels in Europe and North America, and written articles for peer-reviewed publications. The recipient of a PhD, Bénédicte Mauguière earned her Doctorat in Francophone Cultures and Literatures with Honors from Paris Sorbonne University (Paris IV).

April 6, 2012

Bénédicte Mauguière Discusses Colby College

Posted in Uncategorized tagged , , , at 5:03 pm by Benedicte Mauguiere

Founded in 1813, Colby College remains one of the oldest private liberal arts colleges in the United States. Since its inception, the school has maintained a commitment to progress and was the first all-male New England college to accept female students. Located in Maine, Colby remains one of the state’s most selective liberal arts colleges and one of the top in the nation according to Kiplinger, Forbes, and U.S. News & World Report. The Kaplan College Guide and Newsweek have both named the institution as one of the “New Ivies.”

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts allowed Baptist missionaries to establish the Maine Literary and Theological Institution in 1813. The religious leaders desired a school for training new ministers to avoid sending prospective students to England for religious preparation. When Maine separated from Massachusetts seven years later, the Maine legislature changed the school, removing religious prerequisites for admission and changing the process for selecting board members. The following year, the school adopted a new name to reflect its changing mission: Waterville College, named after the town in which it was located. In 1825, the college closed its Theology Department, removing the last vestige of the former institution. During the Civil War, the school almost closed due to students leaving to fight for the Union. A preeminent philanthropist, Gardner Colby, provided the funds necessary to sustain the school, which adopted the name Colby College in his honor in 1867. Four year later, it began admitting women.

Today, students at Colby choose from more than 50 majors and have the option of designing their own unique program of study. The school’s faculty includes some of the most prominent scholars working in academia today. More than two-thirds of students at Colby choose to study abroad, and the school’s program has become one of the most extensive in the United States, including proprietary programs in France, Spain, and Russia.

About the Author
Dr. Bénédicte Mauguière teaches at Colby as a Professor of French and Francophone studies. An accomplished academic, she earned her Doctor of Philosophy in Francophone Studies from Université Paris-Sorbonne, where she focused on female Québécois authors. One of the leaders in her fields, Dr. Bénédicte Mauguière frequently travels to academic institutions throughout the country to lead symposia and give lectures, including Harvard University .

September 29, 2011

Bénédicte Mauguière Discusses Colby College

Posted in Uncategorized tagged , , , at 3:06 pm by Benedicte Mauguiere

Founded in 1813, Colby College remains one of the oldest private liberal arts colleges in the United States. Since its inception, the school has maintained a commitment to progress and was the first all-male New England college to accept female students. Located in Maine, Colby remains one of the state’s most selective liberal arts colleges and one of the top in the nation according to Kiplinger, Forbes, and U.S. News & World Report. The Kaplan College Guide and Newsweek have both named the institution as one of the “New Ivies.”

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts allowed Baptist missionaries to establish the Maine Literary and Theological Institution in 1813. The religious leaders desired a school for training new ministers to avoid sending prospective students to England for religious preparation. When Maine separated from Massachusetts seven years later, the Maine legislature changed the school, removing religious prerequisites for admission and changing the process for selecting board members. The following year, the school adopted a new name to reflect its changing mission: Waterville College, named after the town in which it was located. In 1825, the college closed its Theology Department, removing the last vestige of the former institution. During the Civil War, the school almost closed due to students leaving to fight for the Union. A preeminent philanthropist, Gardner Colby, provided the funds necessary to sustain the school, which adopted the name Colby College in his honor in 1867. Four year later, it began admitting women.

Today, students at Colby choose from more than 50 majors and have the option of designing their own unique program of study. The school’s faculty includes some of the most prominent scholars working in academia today. More than two-thirds of students at Colby choose to study abroad, and the school’s program has become one of the most extensive in the United States, including proprietary programs in France, Spain, and Russia.

About the Author
Dr. Bénédicte Mauguière teaches at Colby as a Professor of French and Francophone studies. An accomplished academic, she earned her Doctor of Philosophy in Francophone Studies from Université Paris-Sorbonne, where she focused on female Québécois authors. One of the leaders in her fields, Dr. Bénédicte Mauguière frequently travels to academic institutions throughout the country to lead symposia and give lectures, including Harvard University.